HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) is a virus that attacks the immune system, specifically targeting the CD4 cells (also known as T cells), which help the body fight off infections. HIV can be transmitted through bodily fluids such as blood, semen, vaginal fluids, and breast milk. The most common ways of contracting HIV are through unprotected sexual contact, sharing of needles or other equipment used to inject drugs, and from mother to baby during pregnancy, childbirth, or breastfeeding.

When HIV infects the body, it begins to replicate and destroy CD4 cells, leading to a gradual weakening of the immune system. As the number of CD4 cells decreases, the body becomes more vulnerable to infections and cancers.

When the HIV infection leads to a significant weakening of the immune system and the person is susceptible to various opportunistic infections, it is diagnosed as AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome). AIDS is the most advanced stage of HIV infection and is a serious and life-threatening condition.

Symptoms of early HIV infection can include fever, headache, fatigue, swollen lymph nodes, and a rash. However, many people may not experience any symptoms during this stage, and the infection may not be diagnosed until the later stages when the immune system is severely weakened.

Diagnosis of HIV is typically done through blood tests, which detect the presence of HIV antibodies in the blood. If the test is positive, further testing may be done to confirm the diagnosis and determine the stage of the infection.

Treatment for HIV typically involves a combination of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs), which work to slow the replication of the virus and help to preserve the immune system. The goal of treatment is to reduce the amount of HIV in the body (also called viral load) to undetectable levels. This is known as viral suppression, and when achieved it not only improves the health of the person living with HIV, but also significantly reduces the risk of transmission to others.

Prevention of HIV includes practicing safe sex by using barrier methods such as condoms and practicing harm reduction measures if using drugs, such as using clean needles and avoiding sharing of equipment. Early diagnosis and treatment of HIV can also help to prevent the progression to AIDS and reduce the risk of transmitting the virus to others.

In conclusion, HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) is a virus that attacks the immune system, specifically targeting CD4 cells, and can lead to a gradual weakening of the immune system. It can be transmitted through bodily fluids such as blood, semen, vaginal fluids, and breast milk. HIV can lead to AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome) when the immune system is significantly weakened. Symptoms of early HIV infection can include fever, headache, fatigue, swollen lymph nodes, and a rash. Treatment typically involves a combination of antiretroviral drugs, and prevention includes practicing safe sex, using barrier methods, and early diagnosis and treatment.

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