0-12 months baby

During the 0-12 months age range, babies are in the early stages of development and are experiencing rapid growth and change in all areas of development.

In terms of physical development, newborns have limited control over their movements and can only make reflexive movements such as grasping and rooting. As they grow, they begin to develop more control over their movements and begin to reach for and grasp objects, roll over, sit up, and crawl. By the end of the first year, many babies will begin to pull themselves up to a standing position and take their first steps. Continue reading “0-12 months baby”

12-18 months baby

During the 12-18 month age range, babies are in the early toddler stage and are continuing to develop rapidly both physically and cognitively.

In terms of physical development, toddlers at this age are typically beginning to take their first steps and becoming more confident walkers. They are also developing fine motor skills, such as being able to use their fingers to pick up small objects, and may begin to use a pincer grasp to hold and manipulate small objects. They may also begin to climb on furniture and pull themselves up to a standing position. Continue reading “12-18 months baby”

18-24 months baby

During the 18-24 month age range, babies are typically in the toddler stage and are continuing to develop rapidly both physically and cognitively.

In terms of physical development, toddlers at this age are typically becoming more stable on their feet and may be taking their first steps or becoming more confident walkers. They are also developing fine motor skills, such as being able to stack blocks, turn pages in a book, and use utensils to feed themselves. They may also be able to climb up and down stairs with assistance and begin to jump with two feet. Continue reading “18-24 months baby”

Hiv and Aids

HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) is a virus that attacks the immune system, specifically targeting the CD4 cells (also known as T cells), which help the body fight off infections. HIV can be transmitted through bodily fluids such as blood, semen, vaginal fluids, and breast milk. The most common ways of contracting HIV are through unprotected sexual contact, sharing of needles or other equipment used to inject drugs, and from mother to baby during pregnancy, childbirth, or breastfeeding. Continue reading “Hiv and Aids”

Epilepsy Disease

Epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by recurrent seizures. Seizures are sudden, brief episodes of abnormal electrical activity in the brain, which can result in a variety of symptoms such as convulsions, loss of consciousness, muscle spasms, and changes in behavior or sensation. Epilepsy can affect people of all ages, and it is one of the most common neurological disorders, affecting about 1% of the global population.

There are several different types of seizures, each of which has its own set of symptoms and characteristics. The most common types are generalized seizures, which involve the entire brain, and partial seizures, which involve only one part of the brain. Some of the most common types of seizures include: Continue reading “Epilepsy Disease”

Atherosclerosis Disease

Atherosclerosis is a chronic disease that affects the blood vessels and is characterized by the buildup of plaque in the inner lining of the arteries. Plaque is made up of cholesterol, fat, and other substances found in the blood, and it can harden and narrow the arteries, making it more difficult for blood to flow through. This can increase the risk of serious health problems such as heart attack, stroke, and peripheral artery disease. Continue reading “Atherosclerosis Disease”

Ways to avoid pregnancy

There are several ways to avoid pregnancy, each with their own advantages and disadvantages. The most effective methods of avoiding pregnancy are hormonal methods such as birth control pills, patches, injections, and intrauterine devices (IUDs), as well as barrier methods such as condoms and diaphragms.

Hormonal methods of birth control work by preventing ovulation, which is the release of an egg from the ovaries. Birth control pills, patches, and injections all contain hormones that prevent ovulation. IUDs are small, T-shaped devices that are inserted into the uterus by a healthcare provider. They can be hormonal or non-hormonal and prevent pregnancy by preventing fertilization of the egg. Continue reading “Ways to avoid pregnancy”

Early birth

Early birth refers to the delivery of a baby before 37 weeks of pregnancy. There are several different causes of early birth, and the risk factors can vary depending on the specific type of early birth.

One of the most common causes of early birth is preterm labor, which occurs when a woman goes into labor before 37 weeks of pregnancy. This can be caused by a variety of factors, including a cervical or uterine infection, a shortened cervix, or a problem with the placenta or umbilical cord. Women who have had a previous preterm birth or a multiple pregnancy (such as twins or triplets) are at a higher risk for preterm labor. Continue reading “Early birth”

Herniated disc

A herniated disc, also known as a slipped or ruptured disc, is a condition in which the outer layer of a spinal disc is damaged, allowing the inner, gel-like material to bulge out and press on nearby nerves. This can cause pain, numbness, and weakness in the affected area.

The symptoms of a herniated disc can vary depending on the location of the herniation and the nerves that are affected. Common symptoms include: Continue reading “Herniated disc”